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. captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news." >> axelrod: good evening. i'm jim axelrod. we are learning more tonight about the investigation that led to the abrupt resignation of c.i.a. chief and retired four-star general david petraeus. petraeus admitted to an affair and submitted his resignation to president obama, and now it turns out, it was the f.b.i. that discovered the relationship was with his biographer. homeland security correspondent bob orr is standing by in washington tonight. good evening, bob. >> reporter: good evening, jim. well, david petraeus is one of america's most decorated and reveered generals. as head of the c.i.a., he was in charge of the nation's most sensitive operations, but the ridgedly disciplined p/e was hiding his own dark secret. sources say c.i.a. director david petraeus was never the target of an f.b.i. investigation but when his name surfaced in another probe, agents became concerned that petraeus, or his e-mail accounts, may have been compromised. it all began a few months ago when a female acquaintance of the c.i.a. director received a
for allegedly revealing classified information. >>> this is the "cbs morning news" for friday, november 9th, 2012. good morning. good to be with you. i'm terrell brown. we begin in washington. there is a new sense of urgency to avert a looming fiscal crisis. it's the so-called fiscal cliff a combination of tax hikes and spending cuts scheduled to kick in next year. both democrats and republicans are talking compromise but we have heard this all before. and in the just released report from the nonpartisan congressional budget office predicts dire consequences unless it's resolved. this mornings stocks in asia dipped on concern over the crisis. tokyo's nikkei and hong kong hang seng were down 1% and wall street investors are selling. the dow jones industrials were down 434 points the last two days. today president obama in his first post-election comment will address the nation's fiscal problems. susan mcginnis is in washington with more on all of this. susan, good morning to you. >> reporter: good morning. you know, not everyone believes that the consequences of going over this fiscal cliff
have a run in on the track. >>> this is the "cbs morning news" for monday, november 12, 2012. >>> good morning. good to be with you. i'm terrell brown. we begin with the resignation of cia director david petraeus. lawmakers want to know if national security was compromised by the extramarital affair that forced him to step down and why they weren't told sooner. it was harassing emails allegedly from petraeus' mistress to another woman that triggered an fbi probe. tara mergener is in washington with details. good morning to you. >> reporter: good morning. jill kelly took her concerns to the fbi several months ago eventually exposing the affair. now congress is demanding more details. cbs news has learned this woman 37-year-old jill kelly triggered an fbi investigation leading to the resignation of cia director david petraeus. petraeus resigned friday after word got out he was having an affair with his biographer paula broadwell. his resignation caught many on capitol hill offguard. >> it was like a lightning bolt. >> reporter: kelly went to the fbi after allegedly receiving emails from
no clue what i'll do after that. >> this is the "cbs morning news" for wednesday, november 28, 2012. >>> good morning. good to be with you. i'm terrell brown. this morning little progress to report in efforts to avert the so-called fiscal cliff, those are the tax increases and spending cuts that will take effect next year. republicans and democrats continue to squabble over raising taxes and sparing entitlement programs like medicare and medicaid. today the president discusses the issues with leaders of major corporations. he met with small business leaders yesterday. susan mcginnis is in washington. >> reporter: while the two sides remain deadlocked president obama is taking his case to the american people trying to drum up support. republicans are complaining that instead of being out campaigning he needs to sit down with them and work out a deal. it's a short drive up pennsylvania avenue from the capital to the white house but congressional republicans and president obama are getting farther apart in their effort to keep the nation from veering off the so-called fiscal cliff. a s
this is the "cbs evening news" with scott pelley. >> pelley: good evening an american soldier accused of a horrific war crime watched in a courtroom as children described the murders of their families. there were two days of testimony in the case of staff sergeant robert bales. bales is charged with 16 counts of pre-meditated murder and six counts of attempted murder. prosecutors say that for reasons unknown bales walked off his post in afghanistan in the middle of the night then shot and stabbed civilians in two villages. the hearing at a military post in washington state was called to decide whether there is enough evidence to court-martial bales. john blackstone has been covering in the courtroom. >> reporter: staff sergeant bales watched the video feed from afghanistan show nothing reaction as ten afghans told of the night their two villages were awakened by gunshots. nine of the murder victims were children. the massacre was one of the worst crimes attributed to a u.s. serviceman in decades. a seven-year-old named rabin that told the court her father was shot right through the throat and chest
by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with scott pelley. >> glor: good evening, and happy thanksgiving, everyone. scott is off tonight. i'm jeff glor. the cease-fire between israel and hamas has passed the first 24 hours. now comes the hard part-- negotiating the details of a truce to make sure is stays. a senior israeli official arrived in cairo today for talks. the head of hamas is there as well. in the meantime, israeli troops that were preparing for a ground invasion began pulling back today. and in gaza, palestinians are cleaning up the damage left behind by eight days of fighting. charlie d'agata is in gaza. >> reporter: gaza city's deserted streets came back to life today. weapons on both sides fell silent as the fragile cease-fire held. after eight days of living in fear, thousands of palestinians gathered in the city square to show support for hamas. you can feel the sense of relief here on the streets of gaza city today that the fighting is over. but hamas is declaring this a celebration of victory. and despite more than a week of suffering, that's exactly how people here see
. captioning sponsored by cbs ponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with scott pelley. >> pelley: good evening. three b.p. oil company employees appeared in federal court today, heo of them charged with 11 counts of involuntary manslaughter. those are for the 11 crewmen killed in 2010 when the deepwater horizon explode excluded and sank in the gulf of mexico. the well ran wild for more than 80 days, unleashing the largest accidental oil spill in history. mark strassmann is covering the courthouse for us in new orleans tonight. mark. mark. >> reporter: scott, this prosecution moves away from the b.p. spill's environmental and economic impacts. instead, its the preventable deaths of 11 people. bob kaluza oversaw safety for b.p. aboard the deepwater horizon when the rig exploded. >> i did not cause this tragedy. i am innocent. and i put my trust, reputation, and future in the hands of the judge and the jury. >> reporter: donald vidrine, another b.p. senior supervisor aboard the rig, also pleaded not guilty. they were in charge of a test that indicated a combustible gas had seeped into wel
investigation. >> oh, wow. captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with scott pelley. >> pelley: good evening. today susan rice had high hopes for what might have been the most important diplomatic mission of her career so far. but the u.s. ambassador to the united nations' attempt to reach agreement with republican senators today failed. rice is a favorite of the president's to be nominated as secretary of state to replace hillary clinton. if he does nominate race, she would have to be approved by the senate. margaret brennan is covering for us tonight. margaret? >> reporter: good evening, scott. ambassador rice asked for the meetings on capitol hill today in hopes of patching up differences she has with at least three republicans. the senators have vowed to stop a nomination of rice because of comments she made after the attack on the u.s. consulate in libya. today for the first time she acknowledged her comments were wrong. ambassador race met her toughest critics behind closed doors to explain why she called the september attack on the consulate a spontaneous demo
. >> reporter: finding a solution in a lame duck congress could prove complicates. susan mcginnis, cbs news, washington. >> the budget office report says that if congress cannot find that solution and the fiscal cliff happens, unemployment would increase back up to 9.1%. >>> virginia's governor isn't waiting, bob mcdonnell already making plans in case we fall off the fiscal cliff. he's ordering all department heads to prepare to cut their budgets by 4%. >> transportation, health, the dmv, you name it. every state agency is being told to get ready. gary nuremberg has more. >> reporter: if those 4% cuts actually happen, state legislators say it is education that gets hit hard. that its transportation that gets hit hard. >> right now we don't have the money we need to invest and this will make things worse. >> reporter: on across the board cuts -- >> the impacts will be severe and you're talking about a budget that already has been cut significantly over the last four years or so. to the point where we are cutting into the bone of our human services. >> reporter: they react to federal cuts whe
in an extramarital affair. agents left carrying several boxes of documents. officials have told cbs news that that began to surface in june when broadwale e-mailed kelley telling her to stay away from petraeus. this was about the same time that broadwell and petraeus broke off their affair. when petraeus learned she was sending harassing e-mails to kelley, he asked her to stop. she has hired a high-powered legal team including john edwards counsel, abbe lowell. friends and former aides say petraeus did not intend to resign from his job until it became clear that the scandal would become public. they now say petraeus is extremely remorseful. >> he said in those words, i screwed up. what i did was wrong. there's no excuses for it. and he's not going to try to explain it away. >> colonel peter mansoor worked directly with petraeus from the summer of 2006 to 2008 and spoke with him several times since the scandal broke friday. mansoor says broadwell was given extended access to the general. >> i found it odd that he would allow someone to have this extensive embed. it
carrying several boxes of documents. officials have told cbs news that that scandal began to surface in june when broadwell e-mailed kelley, telling her to stay away from petraeus. this was about the same time that broadwell and petraeus broke off their affair. sources say when petraeus learned that broadwell was sending harassing messages to kelley, he asked her to stop. kelley was spotted monday leaving her tampa home. she's not commented, but she has hired a high-powered legal team, including abbe lowell. meanwhile, the man at the center of the scandal has also stayed silent. friends and former aides who have spoken with him say petraeus did not intend to resign from his job until it became clear the scandal would become public. they now say petraeus is extremely remorseful. >> he sa, in those words, "i screwed up, what i did was wrong, there's no excuses for it," and he's not going to try to explain it away. >> reporter: colonel peter mansoor worked with petraeus from 2006 to 2008 and he's spoken with him several times since the scandal broke friday. mansoor says broadwell was gi
to support israel's right to defend itself. >> rose: here's what "cbs evening news" reported today from the war zone. >> an angry crowd gathered outside a hospital in gaza this morning as bodies of children killed in yesterday's air strike were brought out to be buried. the four children died, along with their mother and four other family members when their three-story home was hit by an israeli air strike. the husband and father who lost his family was inconsolable. the israeli military says the house is targeted because they believe the hamas commander responsible for launching missiles toward israel was hiding there. but with nine members of the same family killed, the israelis say they're investigating the bombing. throughout the night and into today, the israeli military pounded the gaza strip in a bombardment that came by air and by sea. the air strikes are aimed at crippling hamas and its ability to fire missiles into israel. there's no question why this building was hit by israeli air strikes overnight. it's one of the main police headquarters here in gaza, but with drones flyin
radar. it's on our website, cbssf.com/weather. >>> and new at 6:00, a political feud between berkeley's mayor and a rival councilmember has turned into a grownup game of musical chairs. and we're not kidding. the two leaders are fighting over where they sit at city meetings. cbs 5 political reporter grace lee on how this became an issue in the first place. >> reporter: it's surprising. with all the issues facing government berkeley's council voted on who is sitting next to whom inside those council chambers. this came at the recommendation of the mayor. but it's like a wedding or dinner and there are politics at play and where you sit says a lot. in the city of berkeley, the chair you choose to sit in has become a political punch line. >> a minute ago, we would just standing here and this guy came up and said, oh, be careful -- or don't sit next to me or be careful where you sit. people say these things. >> reporter: the reason for the chair sensitivity the councilman says is because the mayor doesn't like his policies and there is enough animosity that the mayor doesn't even want to
you. also in washington cbs news political director john dickerson. good morning. >> hi, charlie. >> is the white house correct to read the election mandate that the country wants to see taxes raised on those who earn more than $250,000 a year? >> well that certainly is what the exit polls showed us. there was support for those polled for the president's position. the president has had lots of support for that position going back months and months. after the 2010 congressional elections when they won in that wave election that's still where the public was. having a public behind him has not helped the president in previous negotiations. of course, things have changed now. >> what do you think the mood is for compromise now? we've listened to speaker boehner. the president will make his case today. is there generally a mood that enough of this dysfunction, let's get things done and let's compromise, as long as we don't cross over our principles? >> yeah. i think there is a mood for compromise. the question is -- it will be interesting to watch the theater he
into the following interesting thought. ted joined abc news in 1963. i joined cbs in 1957. if my arithmetic is right, together we represent more than 100 years of journalistic experience. i mean, that is enough to depress anybody. [laughter] so, ted, what in god's name have we learned about our sacred craft of journalism? >> i think we have learned not to make predictions. >> what are your predictions? [laughter] >> i predict that your title, provocative as it may be, may be premature. i think that when americans are finally realize how bad things are, and what terrible straits our political system is in, i think there may be a resurgence of the kind you and i grew up with. >> it is a marvelous, optimistic thought. >> actually, no, it is a terrible thought because it suggests that the ship will almost have to sink before people jump into the lifeboats again. >> do you think that we can, truly, even define journalism? if somebody walks in the room and came from mars, and said what are these just talking about? if journalism, explain it to that guy. >> i guess the simplest way is to take it back to wh
's talk about grover norquist. no new taxes pledge. you said earlier in your career, you told cbs morning news earlier today and i'm quoting now, you said you're not obligated on the pledge adding the only thing that i'm honoring is the oath that i take when i'm sworn in this january. so what exactly did you mean by that? did you suggest, did you mean that under certain circumstances you'd be ready to accept an increase in tax rates for the wealthy? >> well, i was just elected, as you know, re-elected, and our campaign materials during the campaign spelled out that the only pledge i would be honoring would be the pledge of the oath of office that you make when you're sworn in. that's what my comments meant. look, i think republicans have shown a willingness to look at revenues as long as we have entitlement reform. those are the two ends of the spectrum, wolf. it appears that speaker boehner has been shown flexibility on revenues and the president on sbimgtsmentes. the point of my op-ed this morning in the "washington post," is look, it's easier to make these decisions and put them behind
about this controversial case on cbs "this morning." your local news is coming up right after the break. >>> welcome back to cbs "this morning." police in central washington thought they had their man in the murder of a high school senior. then a new witness stepped forward with information that threatened to blow this case wide-open. tomorrow night on "48 hours" peter van zandt reports. >> mackenzie cowell of wenatchee, washington was bright, beautiful and full of life. the senior had a keen interest in fashion and the performing arts. and she took courses at a local beauty school. >> mackenzie was a very energetic and motivated person. she had a schedule that was so full that i don't know how she even did it. >> reporter: on a clear and child february day in 2009 mackenzie simply disappeared. >> mackenzie cowell is a student here. it's 3:00. she leaves out this for right here. and she walks over to her car. she gets in. she drives out. she's never seen alive again. >> reporter: four days after she disappeared her body was found along the bank of the columbia river. suspect after suspe
to get it out of them, right? what goes on behind the curtain? john dickerson, cbs news. >> don't forget slate go too. ' and again the best online magazine other than the atlantic, slate. >> i can't tell whether we are in the living room or a therapy room. >> we've got 20 minutes until the show departs for i hope can tune or something. let's start with both of you on the candidates in the last campaign and now we are here for this one. one was different this time around? >> nothing. [laughter] >> you know, it was entirely different from the beginning. there is a lot that has been written about what was different. of course in the first campaign there was this amazing wave of excitement and enthusiasm and many people were projecting what they wanted the than candidate senator obama to be. and this time there was no question it was hard fought. there were harder days. there wasn't a wave at the end as we all know. a very i will call him very senior administration officials said to me, which i think this is a very good analogy for it that the first campaign was like being in a relationship
dickerson, cbs news. [applause] ape the best online magazine flate. >> thank you. i can't tell whether we're in a living room or sthurp room. either up with of you want to lie down >> airport lounge. we have twenty minutes until the shuttle departs for can ciewn or something, i hope. let's start with both of you work for the candidates in the last campaign, you are now here for this one, jen, what was different? >> nothing. [laughter] just kidding. it was entirely different from the beginning. there's a lot that's been written about how it was different. of course, you know, the first campaign there was this amazing wave of excitement and enthusiasm and many people were projecting what they. ed then. candidates senator obama to be. this time was no question harder fought. there were harder days. there wasn't a wave at the end as we know. a very, i'll call him, a very, very senior administration official said to me, i think it's a good analogy for it. the first campaign being like in a relationship. everything is gleeful and happy and don't see any wrong in the other person, and, you know,
, better get our act together in how we're communicating. >> cbs news quoted one adviser to romney saying he was shell shocked, shell shocked by the loss. have you spoken to governor romney? >> i have not since this and we were a bit shell shocked. i thought we had much more of an enthusiasm gap that did not seem to materialize. i know john king was talking about a lot of percentages. but i just thought the sheer number would be larger of people showing up at the polls because they wanted to get rid of barack obama and they were in favor of mitt romney, they realized we were off track, but that did not materialize and i still don't fully understand why it did not. >> when you look at all the data and all the information coming in in your own political sense and you know politics, was it campaign error that resulted in his loss? was it a sense of party's economic policies, for example, or the campaign by the democrats? >> it was all of those things combined. and it's not just political sense because we knew this day was coming. we actually had republican main street commission and wants to
or the cbs evening news, there is a basic impulse on the part of the anchor and the reporters to tell it straight. but cable is where you are getting the opinion. this is your getting the opinion also on the networks so everybody is running around in a circle pointing fingers of everybody saying you are not admitting it. estimate it isn't so much a matter of the bias that the networks. the problem is they simply are not putting the money into the kind of news coverage that is vital to democracy. the money would help in that for one thing you would open up when has the world ever been in your experience and more dangerous place than it is right now? i happen to believe it's the worst times in the cold war. we are the brink of nuclear war with the cuban missile crisis the the fact of the matter there was a balance between the great. these days we need information from the third world more than we ever needed it before. we don't have the reporters out there. >> that's absolutely true. i'm sorry to say at this particular time that we have run out of time which is the relentless clock as r
joined abc news in 1963 could i joined cbs in 1957. if my arithmetic is right come together we represent more than 100 years of journalistic experience. that's enough to depress anybody. [laughter] so, ted, what in god's name have we learned about our craft of journalism in all of these things? >> i think we have learned not to make predictions. >> i predict that your title, provocative as it may be, may be premature. i think that when americans finally realize how bad things are and what terrible straits our political system is in, i think that may be a resurgence of the kind of journalism that you and i grew up with. >> that is a marvelous very optimistic. >> actually it's a very terrible thought because it suggests the ship almost has to sink before people are willing to jump back into the lifeboats. >> but do you think that we can truly even define journalism? if somebody walked into the room right now and said what are they talking about? journalism. explain it to that guy. >> i think the simplest way to explain it is to to get back to when you and i were young and what you and i be
the nyse's system. stocks like cbs, united healthcare still trading with orders a round other platforms, just not the new york exchanges because it ran into a technical problem as it is moving to the universal platform. just a little glitch there. it did not stop from trading. and the new york exchange will determine the official closing price for the affected securities consolidated reading of last sale prices. think of trying to help them stay within the law. a software fix will be applied to fix the problem. joining me now, global head of international economic. great to have you here. let's start with, there seems to be a little sense that these guys, these guys being the president of the united states and congress, specifically the speaker actually want to do something about the fiscal cliff. did you get that read today? >> i think it is increasingly clear that they are realizing if they don't act, the implications for the economy are going to be truly first order. with growing over the cliff, holding their risk of recession in tutus it -- 2013, and that is not good for anybody's p
with this -- for this program. i ran into the following interesting thought. ted joined abc news in 1963. i joined cbs in 1957. if my arithmetic is right, together we represent more than 100 years of journalistic experience. i mean, that is enough to depress anybody. [laughter] so, ted, what in god's name have we learned about our sacred craft of journalism? >> i think we have learned not to make predictions. >> what are your predictions? [laughter] >> i predict that your title, provocative as it may be, may be premature. i think that when americans are finally realize how bad things are, and what terrible straits our political system is in, i think there may be a resurgence of the kind you and i grew up with. >> it is a marvelous, optimistic thought. >> actually, no, it is a terrible thought because it suggests that the ship will almost have to sink before people jump into the lifeboats again. >> do you think that we can, truly, even define journalism? if somebody walks in the room and came from mars, and said what are these just talking about? if journalism, explain it to that guy. >> i guess the simplest w
you're frustrated to watch the daily news. will broadcast medium abc, cbs, nbc, cnn, fox, any thing with 9/11 or terrorism always guilty before you are proven innocent and rush to judgment. the reporting is not in depth. the problem media faces with the original foreign correspondent. they will living there they come back with the real story. with the arabs spring it was the beginning of the revolution now it was a different story because now we use youtube or bad quality television. but it depends. you can still read fantastic stories and use the terrible reporting on stations like fox news. >> how would arab media of fact -- defect or handle the matters in media? i suspect americans to enjoy positioning the and it was before. why is that? the palestinian issue the front pages was day touching point* because of the support for israel so i see the criticism. president obama also helped the american administration in. something interesting, burning the american flag, you could see that in syria. or the chinese flags. have the iranians, russians, now being burned regular the. governme
talking points. when you look at what she said cbs, face the nation, also on "meet the press," not only was that piece omitted, also she said that al-qaida was decimated. martha: this is a new report that claims that benghazi was not the only al-qaida-linked terror attack on september 11th. were some of those other attacks al-qaida inspired or linked. that is a big tor story we are pursuing. we are joined by peter king. chairman of the homeland community. good to see you. >> good to be with you. martha: if susan rice is indeed considered for secretary of state we need to know where she stands on the issue of al-qaida and whether or not she believes that al-qaida is still a threat, is a growing threat. she says they were decimated. perhaps that is the most important thing that needs to come out of these discussions, what does she really believe about al-qaida in this region? >> right, martha, benghazi we're talking about the past, it's very important but it is the past. despite what susan rice this is about the status of al-qaida that will determine the policy over the next several years
the attack on every major news network. but here is what's more troubling. it wasn't just susan rice who did that. if you recall, the president went not only on letterman, univision, the day after the cbs interview and 14 days later before the united nations, he did not call it a terrorist attack, nor did he reference it as connected to al-qaeda or an al-qaeda affiliated group. in fact, the only reference he made to al-qaeda in that u.n. speech to the world was that al-qaeda had been weakened and osama bin laden was dead. so i think this raises additional questions. it goes beyond ambassador rice. first of all, why were the talking points changed? it doesn't make any sense to me that we were trying to dupe al-qaeda that. doesn't pass the laugh test. buff also why was the president out 14 days later and still fail to go call it a terrorist attack to the world? >> steve: absolutely. because we don't know a lot of what is told by the intelligence community to the president of the united states, but we understand that 72 hours after the attack the presidential daily briefing, which tells the pre
Search Results 0 to 35 of about 36 (some duplicates have been removed)